Leonardo, Volume 57, Issue 1 | Leonardo/ISASTwith Arizona State University
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Contents

Editorial

Artists’ Articles

  • Luminous skins: Costume as a Central Element of a Swarm-Based Scenography
    Iztok Hrga
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    Abstract
    Luminous skins are interactive, light-costume hybrids that reimagine the boundaries of the performers’ physical bodies, broadcast their feelings, and alter their environment. The costumes are the central element of a performance that requires no stage space, no fixed lighting, no wall outlets, and no lighting technicians. The performers manage to dance through the darkness with the light they wear. The costumes are equipped with sensors and actuators that communicate wirelessly in real time with other scenographic elements. Together, they form a swarm-based scenography that involves close coordination between the performers and responsive technology to create visually dynamic and immersive atmospheres.

  • Piece of Mind: Presenting the Lived Experience and Scientific Research of Parkinson’s Disease through an Artistic Lens
    Naila Kuhlmann, Jérémie Robert, Aliki Thomas, Stefanie Blain-Moraes
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    Abstract
    Many of the important research advances in understanding and treating Parkinson’s disease never leave the academic sphere, as communication barriers limit accessibility for, and engagement with, broader audiences. To increase meaningful dialogue between academic researchers and community stakeholders, Piece of Mind: Parkinson’s brought together neuroscientists, people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and artists to co-create a knowledge translation performance based on scientific research and lived experience. The filmed, feature-length performance engages the viewer emotionally and intellectually using circus, dance, music, poetry, and patient testimonials. We provide an overview of our participatory process and a scene-by-scene description of the performance.

  • Designing a Long-Structure NFT Generative Art Project: Catharsis As a Case Study
    Dario Lanza
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    Abstract
    For decades considered a fringe artistic discipline, generative art has in recent years piqued an unusual amount of interest due to its integration with blockchain technology, which has given rise to new ways of designing, generating, acquiring, and collecting generative artworks. This article presents, by way of a chronicle, the author’s process in designing and creating a long-form generative project entitled Catharsis, from its conceptual genesis through the challenges and innovations it presented upon its public launch in September 2022, with a view to offering a guide that may inspire future generative artists or scholars.

  • Cartography of Touch: Transformation of Touch through Anatomical Projections
    Hana Pokojná
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    Abstract
    Both the conception of how people connect changes with the evolution of technology and the circumstances under which we interact changed drastically with the onset of the global COVID-19 pandemic and have changed again during the decline of the pandemic threat. With the art installation Cartography of Touch, the author uses digital and physical media (3D printing and projection mapping of human physiology) to demonstrate the need for human touch. The installation depicts response to touch as the joining of the technological age and the need for essential human interaction through physical touch, which cannot be replaced, using plastic human hands with artificial responses.

  • Transdisciplinarity, Composition, Expression: Reflections on a Spherical Way of Thinking
    Adriana Sá
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    Abstract
    Bridging art, music, philosophy, and perception science, this article proposes a spherical way of thinking. The term evokes an inclination to sense connections between all things, implying a transdisciplinary approach to the world. The tensions between differing viewpoints can drive us to think beyond any dichotomy, and uncertainty can inspire creativity. By showing how this possibility is reflected in her work, the author hopes to activate new questions and new ways of addressing those questions.

  • The Belitung Shipwreck in Virtual Reality: Exploring the Narrative Framework of Digital Cultural Heritage
    Baosheng Wang, Qing Liang
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    Abstract
    Building on the work of Belitung VR, this article seeks to explore a narrative framework for digital cultural heritage storytelling. Belitung VR is a serious game intended to disseminate cultural knowledge about its subject via VR, wherein users can freely explore the virtual reconstruction of a shipwrecked Arab dhow to learn about historical shipping between China and West Asia while collecting clues to the cause(s) of the wreck. The framework consists of narrative goals (physical and nonphysical), narrative elements (character, world, and plot), and narrative grammar (immersion, interaction, rhetoric, and factuality). This work can serve as a practice guide and evaluative framework for designers/artists with an aspiration to digitally disseminate cultural heritage.

Artist’s Note

  • A Lesson with Francis Bacon Forced Me to See Outside the Software Box
    Nelson Diaz
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    Abstract
    Computers became more standard in the early 1980s, and science and technology were influencing artists like the author. He began using a supercomputer and FORTRAN 77 software to define a non-Euclidean geometry model using conformal mapping to create art. A series of twisted and curved space images was manifested, reflective of Albert Einstein’s theories of general and special relativity. It was the author’s encounter with Edward Teller, “father of the H-bomb,” that led the author to artist Francis Bacon. It was a private lesson with the artist that forced the author out of the box and into his own visual world.

Erratum

General Articles

  • One Never Knows
    Mihai Nadin
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    Abstract
    Understanding anticipatory action as undergirding the dynamics of life is the prerequisite for defining what art is. Its change over time reflects the fact that life is purposeful and escapes prediction. Explaining art from the perspective of means and methods involved in producing it, from a deterministic view, leads to circular reasoning: the conclusion (machine art is the future) is in the premise (machines can make art). This fallacy becomes evident in the context of the current infatuation with automation of artmaking (especially through AI), and even art evaluation. The role art plays in defining the human condition is no less significant than that of science, itself indebted to aesthetics in its expression.

  • Mapping Cultural Flows through Contemporary Art in Translation: The Translation(s) Project
    Zoran Poposki, Marija Todorova
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    Abstract
    This article examines the role of translation in contemporary art through a case study of the curatorial project Translation(s), curated by Zoran Poposki in collaboration with Laurence Wood, realized in three editions over five years and involving more than 30 video works by international artists. By exploring the dual significance of translation as a motif and a method, this article investigates how artists engage with the complexities of communication and reinterpretation. The analysis highlights the transformative potential of translation, transcending linguistic barriers and extending into the realm of visual representation, cultural expression, and artistic practices.

Technical Articles

  • An Eye-Tracking Study on Viewer Compliance with the Gestalt Closure Principle: Analyzing the Impact of Gap Size and the Golden Ratio
    Xinran Hu
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    Abstract
    The Gestalt principle of closure refers to brain activity filling in missing information to perceive objects as complete, even when partially hidden. Designers leverage this principle to imply shapes without explicitly showing them. However, evaluating viewer responses poses challenges. The author conducted a comprehensive eye-tracking experiment to determine when viewers mentally completed a gap in a circle and explored the potential influence of the golden ratio on the closure principle. The golden ratio, approximately 1.618, is associated with visual harmony and is used in art and design to create pleasing proportions. Findings showed that viewers tend to mentally close gaps up to 135° but avoid closure beyond 150°. This suggests the golden ratio’s relevance in applying the closure principle to design.

  • Using a Drift Diffusion Model to Validate the Quantification of Style Prototypicality as Assessed by the Viewers of Paintings
    Shigen Fang Ogata, Tatsunori Matsui, Yoshimasa Tawatsuji
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    Abstract
    When appreciating a painting, people often classify it into a style. The extent to which the painting is regarded as a typical example of the style is called its style prototypicality. The authors propose a method of quantifying style prototypicalities and conduct an experiment to validate this method using the drift rate parameter of the drift diffusion model. This parameter is calculated using participants’ decision-making response times. The authors find a positive correlation (r = .88, p < .001) between the drift rates and the quantified prototypicalities for the paintings used in this study, confirming the psychological appropriateness of the proposed quantification method.

Special Section: Music and Sound Art

  • Soundscapes of a Century: The Art and Transmission of Irish Broadcasting’s 100-Year Milestone
    Jimmy Eadie
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    Abstract
    This article examines two renditions of an artwork titled 100, which celebrate a historic radio transmission in 1916 during the Irish war for independence. The centenary artwork delves into the concept of radio transmission as an artistic expression rather than solely a practical function. The work explores the intersection of radio transmission with installation art, as well as its connections to sound art and sound design. Engaging with diverse theoretical frameworks, the article interrogates the boundaries of radio and its relationship with other media expressions. It also seeks to understand important historical works and events within radio, with a focus on exploring the roots of radio and its history in Ireland.

Special Section: Pioneers and Pathbreakers

  • When the Computer Entered the Music Scene: The Collaboration between the Centro di Sonologia Computazionale and La Biennale di Venezia
    Sergio Canazza, Giovanni De Poli, Alvise Vidolin
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    Abstract
    The era of collaboration between the Centro di Sonologia Computazionale (CSC) and the Venice Biennale in the early 1980s marked a real breakthrough in the development of technological art and computer music. Thanks to this collaboration, computer music, which in those years was confined to research laboratories with auditions for insiders, entered the global contemporary music scene. This interview by Sergio Canazza, current director of CSC, with two leading figures of that endeavor aims to bear witness to that creative turning point.

  • The *.* Group’s Contribution to the Development of Technological Art in Brazil
    Artemis Sanchez Moroni
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    Abstract
    The author describes three interactive installations presented by the *.* Group from the turn of the 1980s to the 1990s. The first installation, Fractal Art, explored the fractal theme through various mediums, including images, music, sculpture, video, and photoelectric sensors. The second installation, Foreseen Variations, featured a robot performing a choreography with a dancer in an environment equipped with a camera and TV sets, allowing the audience to be immersed in a virtual performance. The third installation, Aurora Beings, was a continuation of the previous one, where young people could program a choreography for the robot and act as both artists and engineers within the environment.

  • Teresa Wennberg, Pioneer Video and Computer Artist: Early Experiences in Video and Computer Art
    Teresa Wennberg
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    Abstract
    The author, a Swedish artist, arrived in Paris in the 1970s as a painter. She then began working with electronic images and was one of the first artists to produce video in France. Following the evolution of the technology very closely, she continued to develop 2D and 3D computer art, often presented as multimedia installations. Eventually, she began working with virtual reality. In this article, she delivers a personal recollection of the beginning of her artistic meandering, current through the time of writing.

Leonardo Reviews

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ISSN: 
1071-4391
Title: 

Leonardo, Volume 57, Issue 1

February 2024