Roger Malina

Editorial Advisorat university of texas at dallas
Dallas,
United States
Focus area: Writing, Literature, Poetry

Roger Malina is a physicist, astronomer and Executive Editor of the Leonardo publications at MIT Press. With dual appointments as Professor of Arts and Technology and Professor of Physics at UT Dallas, his work focuses on connections among the natural sciences and arts, design and humanities.

Malina is the former Director of the Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille Provence (OAMP) in Marseille and was a member of its observational cosmology group which collaborated on investigations regarding the nature of dark matter and dark energy. He has been a member of the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Study (Institut Méditerranéen de Recherches Avancées, IMERA), that contributes to trans-disciplinarity between the sciences and the arts and places emphasis on the human dimensions of the sciences.

With a specialty in space instrumentation, Malina was the principal investigator for the NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite at the University of California, Berkeley. He also founded the Leonardo organizations in San Francisco and Paris, whose missions are to promote work that explores the intersection of the arts, sciences, and new technologies.

Malina received an Honorary Doctorate from the Polytechnic University of Valencia Spain, holds a BS in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in Astronomy from the University of California, Berkeley.

Journal Articles:
Open Call to the Leonardo Community

Rethinking Leonardo

February 2003
Leonardo Reviews

What Is Science? by Sundar Sarukkai, National Book Trust, India, New Delhi, 2012. 225 pp. Paper. ISBN: 978-81-237-6367-5

October 2012
Special Section: Global Crossings: The Cultural Roots of Globalization: The Spirit and Power of Water Project

Introduction: The Spirit and Power of Water: A Leonardo Virtual Africa Workshop

August 2003
Special Section: Highlights from the IEEE VIS 2013 Arts Program (VISAP’13): Part 1

DataRemix: Designing the Datamade

October 2015
Artists' Statements

Texts by Jean-Bernard Condat Retracted From Leonardo Because of Plagiarism

August 2003
Leonardo Reviews

Une Archeologie des Media, Exhibition, Seconde Nature

April 2016
Editorial

Artists and Scientists in Times of War: A Renewed Call for Papers

June 2005
Editorial

What Is the Evidence that Art-Science-Technology Collaboration Is a Good Thing?

February 2018
Special Section: The Aesthetic Status of Technological Art

Introduction: The Aesthetic Status of Technological Art

June 1999
Endnote

Executive Summary of SEAD Exemplars: Evidence of the Value of Transdisciplinary Projects Report for the National Academies

February 2018

Transarchitectures: Visions of Digital Communities

February 1999

Les Particules Elementaires

April 1999

Robert Rauschenberg: A Retrospective

June 1999

Inventing Experience: Experiments in New Media at Interval Research

April 2000
Special Issue: Pacific Rim New Media Summit Companion

Network Theory: Art, Science and Technology in Cultural Context

August 2006
From the Leonardo Archive

From the Leonardo Archive

August 2007
Editorial

A Call for New Leonardos

February 2008
Editorial

Intimate Science and Hard Humanities

June 2009

Letter from Leonardo's Executive Editor

August 2000
Editorial

Alt.Art-Sci: We Need New Ways of Linking Arts and Sciences

February 2011
Editorial

The New Leonardos

August 2001
Editorial

In Praise of Hybridity: Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of Frank J. Malina

October 2013

The Stone Age of the Digital Arts

October 2002
Leonardo Reviews

La science n'est pas l'art by Jean-Marc Lévy-Leblond. Editions Hermann, Paris, France, 2010. 119 pp., illus. ISBN: 978-27056-6945-4

February 2012